Waiting for an Echo: Words in the Darkness Outline Sample

Words in the Darkness is the debut novel of Jann Rowland and Lelia Eye and the first novel of the Waiting for an Echo duology. Below you can find the first five chapters of the outline they made for this novel.

 

Hertfordshire (Beginning in October):

  • Chapter 1: (“It is a truth universally acknowledged…”??)
    • Begin with some lead-up, explain the presence of the gentleman and how Elizabeth begs off going to the assembly.
  • Chapter 2: At the assembly on Tuesday, October 15, it is Bingley, Darcy, and his sister.
    • Georgiana is none too pleased with Bingley’s evident interest in Jane.
    • Kitty has the steps memorized and dances at the ball with close friends and family, people she trusts to guide her.
  • Chapter 3: Elizabeth has a conversation with her father, who is sickly and worries about his daughters’ fates, wanting them to marry well.
  • Chapter 4: Afterward, Elizabeth hears tales of the proud Mr. Darcy and the wonderful Mr. Bingley.
    • Lydia is her normal self, of course.
    • Elizabeth admonishes (probably several times) about how, no, she did not regret missing the assembly, and no, she doesn’t like to dance.
    • Lydia mentions something about dancing every dance, while obliquely referencing her status as super-flirt (without even realizing it) and Lizzy responding that she could well imagine that.
  • Chapter 5: The next day, Mr. Bingley comes to call. He asks the Misses Bennet to come on a walk with him (Lydia is not around, as she is visiting with the Phillips). Before they leave, Mrs. Bennet cries out that she must have some flowers, as the table is looking rather bare.
    • Bingley and Jane walk together while Lizzy and the quiet Kitty do (OR Jane guides Kitty while Bingley and Elizabeth walk together, as Jane wants Elizabeth’s approval).
    • Bingley is charming to Elizabeth (who likes him very much for Jane, who often gives a shy smile toward him).
    • Note the differences and similarities between Elizabeth and Jane.
      • They have the same shape of face.
      • Jane is light, tall, and willowy.
      • Elizabeth is darker and more petite–she has always felt her sister to be prettier, largely due to Jane’s pale appearance.
      • Perhaps they have a slight similarity in body shape.
    • Darcy comes up on a horse and dismounts.
      • He briefly looks at the sisters, resting his intense gaze last on Elizabeth—for longer, but still not too long.
    • He is introduced to Elizabeth, who missed the ball due to a headache.
      • Darcy is a bit attracted to Elizabeth immediately, but what with Anne and Elia he is confused about the whole business.
    • With a stiff nod, Darcy asks Elizabeth if she is feeling better.
      • She says there is little indeed that can keep her away from the outside for long—certainly, if she received an ailment which required her to remain in bed for the rest of her life, she should succumb to it, for the outdoors means too much to her.
      • Darcy says there are plenty of entertainments for the inside.
      • She says indeed, she loves to read, but she prefers to combine her pleasures when possible.
      • Bingley says she should see Darcy’s library, and Darcy seems rather stiff.
      • Elizabeth says her father’s library does her well, and she often rereads that which she likes most (such as?).
    • Elizabeth likes horses and comments on the fineness of Darcy’s.
      • Perhaps Bingley calls Darcy an excellent horseman.
      • There should be some talk about horses and perhaps the horseflesh Darcy has.
      • Elizabeth notes her regard for riding the creatures.
    • Darcy asks if Bingley has forgotten of their engagement.
      • Bingley smiles and says no indeed but he wished to call briefly upon the Bennets.
      • Alas, he must escort them back home. He does so, and they all go inside.
    • Elizabeth realizes she had forgotten the flowers her mother had requested; not wanting to hear from her the rest of the day, she opens the door and discovers Bingley and Darcy holding on to their horses’ reins and talking.
      • “Are the two eldest Misses Bennet not especially lovely creatures?” Bingley asks.
      • “I have seen many a handsomer woman,” Darcy notes.
    • Bingley goads Darcy into saying something such as, “The elder Miss Bennet is certainly a fine woman, but I think her sister Miss Elizabeth Bennet rather plain.”
      • (Maybe he’s just mentally comparing Jane to Elia and hasn’t really thought about how Elizabeth looks. Or perhaps Darcy is trying to put off Bingley by saying he doesn’t find Elizabeth pretty when he really does? Bingley likely doesn’t want Darcy to marry Anne because he knows Darcy does not love her.)
    • Something something, then Darcy looks at Elizabeth, who colors and disappears inside.
      • Inside, she rests against the door and chuckles, and then she goes to repeat the conversation to Jane.